Black History Month Lecture and Discussion 2018

U.S. Embassy Teacher Training Seminar

Black History Month Lecture and Discussion 2018

Wednesday, February 14, 2018, 15:00-17:00

Venue:   U.S. Embassy, entrance Behrenstr. (back entrance)

KINDLY ARRIVE BY 14:45 FOR CHECK-IN.  PLEASE REMEMBER TO BRING A VALID I.D. AND, IF POSSIBLE, LEAVE YOUR ELECTRONIC DEVICES AT HOME. PLEASE NOTE:  Laptops are not permitted in the building.

Please register at: IRCBerlin@state.gov by February 7, 2018.  Contact:  Dr. Martina Kohl, U.S. Embassy; KohlM@state.gov

Noaquia Callahan

Founder/Chief Executive Officer

The Colored Bird Institute, a privately launched initiative that helps students of color to develop into future leaders and tap resources that help them grow academically and personally.

“The Blueprint: Closing the Achievement Gap and Getting Students of Color Prepared for the Global Workforce.”

 

U.S. employers have identified the link between international experience and workforce development.  In a 2014 Coalition for International Education study, two-thirds of senior management reported a need for international skills at the entry and management levels. With a record high 800,000+ international students reported to be attending U.S. colleges and universities over the last few years, and over 313,000 American students studying and working abroad, the blueprint for development of a global workforce is clearly defined, and study abroad is playing a major role toward enhancing employment prospects. Unfortunately, for students of color, access to the skills and training necessary to prepare them for a global workforce is lacking.  In this context, education and employment all relate to the achievement gap. Closing the achievement gap is a major concern confronting African American students. Putting black students on par with white students affords for greater access to employment opportunities that will create and sustain income and wealth-building. The discussion presented here will:

  1. Help participants gain an understanding of global workforce talent development and why U.S. employers place an emphasis on study abroad, cultural knowledge and language skills for potential new employees 
  2. Identify best practices in global workforce talent development 
  3. Discuss how students of color benefit from career training and skill development toward participation in the global workforce 
  4. Offer attendees the opportunity to share how this discussion might apply to German classrooms

 

Noaquia Callahan is the founder and chief executive officer of the Colored Bird Institute . She is an educator, speaker, mentor, and diversity & inclusion consultant whose expertise has been sought after by national and international institutions such as Howard University, the University of Iowa, U.S. Embassy Berlin, and the University of Halle-Wittenberg. She is a PhD Candidate in History at the University of Iowa (2018), holds a master’s in History from the University of Iowa and bachelor’s degrees in German and Sociology from California State University Long Beach. Callahan was a high school exchange student (in Köln, Germany), an undergraduate exchange student (University of Munich, Germany), and a PhD researcher (Free University Berlin’s JFK Institute). She was selected as Fulbright Germany’s top candidate in 2016 to receive a special Germanistic Society of America Fulbright award. She is the recipient of other major scholarly fellowships such as the Doctoral Fellowship in African American History at the German Historical Institute in Washington D.C., Samuel Flagg Bemis Dissertation Research Grant from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, and Andrew Mellon-Moorland Travel-to-Collections Grant at Howard University. In 2017, she was awarded a Hancher-Finkbine Medallion – the University of Iowa’s highest honor recognizing those who exemplify the characteristics of loyalty, learning, and leadership.